Term of the Week: English Method

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Term of the Week: English Method

This week’s Term of the Week dives back into some more technical terminology!

When looking through cross-stitch techniques, guides, and instructions, you may come across the phrase ‘English Method’. And if you were like me, you’ll have no idea what that means. Luckily, the concept is actually pretty simple.

There are two main methods of stitching the crosses in cross-stitch: the English Method, and the Danish Method. We covered the Danish Method last week. Today, we’ll cover the English one!

When you make your stitches, if you do each ‘x’ at a time – so / and \ to make your x – before moving on to the next stitch in the row or column, they call that the English Method of stitching! It’s as simple and basic as that.

The English Method is also called the Vertical method because that is the primary use for this method of stitching. You use it to make a vertical column of crosses. Stitchers do not recommend using this method on horizontal rows. Also, this method is more sturdy and anchored on the fabric, but it also uses a lot more thread than the alternative of the Danish Method.

English Method

Example of the English Method of stitching

I don’t know why the English Method is called that. I tried finding the origin behind the name. My assumption was it was used primarily by the English in their embroidery work and that’s how it got its name. I couldn’t find anything to confirm this though. If any readers happen to know or have a source to the origin, feel free to let me know!

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term of the Week: Danish Method

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Term of the Week: Danish Method

This week’s Term of the Week dives back into some more technical terminology!

When looking through cross-stitch techniques, guides, and instructions, you may come across the phrase ‘Danish Method’. And if you were like me, you’ll have no idea what that means. Luckily, the concept is actually pretty simple.

There are two main methods of stitching the crosses in cross-stitch: the Danish Method, and the English Method. Today we’ll cover the Danish Method.

When you are making your stitches, if you go all the way down the row doing half stitches like this: / / / / / /, and then go back across the row to finish your crosses like this: \ \ \ \ \ \ , that is the Danish Method of stitching! It’s as simple and as basic as that.

The Danish Method is also called the Horizontal method because that is the primary use for this method of stitching, when you are stitching on a horizontal row of crosses. Stitchers do not recommend using this method when stitching on vertical columns. Also, this method, while less sturdy on the fabric, uses less embroidery floss than doing it another way. I don’t know about anyone else, but the Danish Method is how I was taught to stitch.

A small, kind of pixelated example of the Danish Method!

A small, kind of pixelated example of the Danish Method!

I don’t know why the Danish Method is called that. I tried finding the origin behind the name. My assumption was it’s used primarily by the Danes in their embroidery work and that’s how it got its name. I couldn’t find anything to confirm this though. If any readers happen to know or have a source to the origin, feel free to let me know!

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

A Stitcher’s Dictionary: Table of Contents

A Stitcher's Dictionary: Table of Contents

A Stitcher’s Dictionary: Table of Contents

Each week on Little Thread Crafts I do a Term of the Week dictionary article, where I pick a common word or phrase among cross-stitchers and explain its meaning. Here they are, all collected, as a Stitcher’s Dictionary!

Below you will find an alphabetized list of every term I’ve done so far. Think of it like a cross-stitcher’s dictionary, and this is the table of contents.

Click the word to read the article. Happy Stitching!

» Read more

Term of the Week: PMS

Term of the Week: PMS

Term of the Week: PMS

This week’s Term of the Week is another acronym where stitchers have taken a word and claimed it as their own!

So, what does PMS mean? It’s fairly simple: PMS means Protecting My Stash. Actual PMS is known for its moodiness and irritability, which is what happens to stitchers whenever someone tries to threaten our stash! A common phrase to hear is, “Someone wants to clean out my craft room and I’m PMSing!”

As all stitchers know, we are very protective of our stash… so if someone tries to come between us and our stash – whether to say we have too much or wanting us to give or even – gasp! – throw some of it away, stitchers can get very aggressive and snappy!

Whenever I see the word used by stitchers, I picture a dragon hoarding and protecting its cave full of stashed stitching stuff. It’s definitely a useful term when you think about it!

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term of the Week: FFO

Term of the Week FFO

This week’s Term of the Week is actually a request from a reader!

Let’s get right down to it: what does FFO mean, exactly? Unless you’re familiar with another popular cross stitch term, UFO, the acronym won’t mean much to you. But if you know what UFO means, then FFO makes a lot of sense!

FFO stands for Finally Finished Object. It is the term and acronym for when you finish a UFO, or really any piece that feels like it’s taken forever to finish. It’s a term that means success and achievement, because you finally got over that roadblock to finish something that’s been on the list for a long time.

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term Of The Week: Craftermath

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Today’s Term of the Week was posted on my Instagram feed, and I decided I must do a Term of the Week on it! It fits so many so well.

So, what does the word Craftermath mean? It’s pretty basic. A Craftermath is the aftermath of a particularly intense crafting session. It is most often demonstrated by your crafting area of choice being a total disaster.

I’m sure we’ve all been there. You get into a particular groove and you can just go and go and go! And when you’re finished, your area looks like a tornado blew through it. There are fabric and bits of thread everywhere. I never look forward to cleaning up once I’ve had a long stitching session, as it usually gets pretty messy! Especially if I kitted up the project at the same time as well.

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

 

Term of the Week: PIZL

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This week’s Term of the Week made me laugh when I saw it. I had to cover it for today’s term. It applies to me so well!

So, what does a bunch of random looking letters like PIZL mean? Well, it’s actually an anagram for a bunch of different words.

PIZL stands for Projects In Zip Locks. What does it mean? What are Zip Locks?

Ziplock is a type of plastic bag for things like sandwiches that seal together using grooves like a zipper. They are resealable and come in all different sizes. So Projects In Zip Locks – PIZL – literally means cross-stitch projects you keep in resealable plastic bags as a means of storage.

This applies to me so well because I use the plastic bag storage almost exclusively for my projects. Once I open a kit or get all my supplies kitted up for a chart, I stick them all together in a plastic ziplock bag – usually a Ziploc brand, which is the company the word came from.

For anyone else who may use the same system of storage, this is the term to describe what you use!

Just some of my PIZL!

Just some of my PIZL!

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term of the Week: SABLE

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We choose another very popular acronym out of our stitchy bag for this week’s Term of the Week! This acronym is much more well-known and popular than SINS.

Unlike SINS, SABLE is not a real word (okay I take that back, it’s some kind of animal) but to stitchers it is an acronym that has a pretty big meaning. SABLE stands for Stash Acquired Beyond Life Expectancy.

The big thing about cross-stitch and stash is that stitching takes time, and any chart you buy may never be stitched. Even an extremely fast stitcher can take several months to get through large projects. And there are so many beautiful and adorable things in this craft beyond the stitching itself. From hand-dyed fabric to embroidery scissors to needle minders to scissor fobs to thread to lights to stands, a stash cupboard (or bins under the bed, as the case may be) can and will fill up quickly.

Between the charts for the stitching, the stitching itself, and all the lovely accessories to go with the stitching, the ability to stitch and use everything literally extends beyond the average person’s life expectancy. Hence, the word SABLE.

When is this most often used? In the phrase, “I just sorted through my stash! This is definitely SABLE,” usually accompanied by picture of the bed/floor/room being covered in fabric, thread, charts, and kits.

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term of the Week: Finish

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Today’s Term of the Week is one used by all stitchers! It’s a lot like the term Kit by the fact that it is used as both a noun and a verb. It’s actually a very basic term used in hundreds of other applications in the English language, but I thought I should go over it regardless. 🙂

Noun:

A Finish is a term used to described a completed cross-stitch project. It can be used interchangeably as a noun and an adjective, like “my newest finish” or “my finished Love Bug piece.” Whenever someone talks about their finish or their finishes, they mean they have a project that’s been completed! I use it most frequently as “my finished piece”, because I refer to my cross-stitch projects as cross-stitch “pieces” a majority of the time.

Verb:

To Finish is exactly what it sounds like, and is the exact same usage as it would be for anything else. For example, “I finished my latest project last night!” It also usually encompasses a sense of pride because you managed to finish the project in question and create a keepsake that will last for generations to come!

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

Term of the Week: Kit

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Term of the Week is back, with some brand new terms that every stitcher, beginner to advanced, should know!

The first term we’re going over this week is a term you will run across constantly in cross-stitch. The term has evolved to mean several things, and is also used as a noun and a verb!

Noun:

A Kit is a prepackaged cross-stitch supply. A kit comes with a charted design, aida fabric, needle, all the colors of thread you need, and instructions telling you how to get started, how to stitch, and how to finish the project. Depending on the size of the project, sometimes kits even come with sticky backing and a frame to finish the project yourself. Generally those who get started into cross-stitch start with kits, because all the supplies are already there.

Some kits are different than others. You can find kits for cookie jars, pot holders, picture frames, bookmarks, iPhone cases, hanging frames, and many other actual items. Other kits come with the charts and instructions like a kit, but gives you the option to choose fabric and colors.

Verb:

To Kit is a verb used to describe when someone has collected all the materials they need to start a project, such as “I kitted up my HAED last night.” Generally, people pick out the fabric they want to use, such as a hand-dyed aida fabric, pick out their colors, wrap them up in bobbins and organize them, pick out their needles, get their hoops or scroll frames or Q-Snaps ready, and get it all put together so they can begin working on the project. It’s the same principle as buying an actual kit, which is why they call it “kitting.”

The cross-stitch community is evenly divided on their feelings for kits. Some, like me, love kits because you don’t have to worry about buying any supplies, and they’re perfect for small projects. Others hate kits and will only ever buy charts and leaflets, because there is never enough thread to finish the kit and they don’t like having to buy everything, they’d rather pick out fabric and colors themselves.

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“Term of the Week” is a weekly blog post highlighting a new word or phrase commonly used among cross-stitchers but not found in an ordinary dictionary. These posts are to help explain the words’ meanings in context and provide a resource for anyone wondering what a term like “frogging” means. Check back every Thursday!

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